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Monthly Archives: November 2014

Starling Survey: Not just blue skies research!

By Amanda Hardy AMSB, Schools and Colleges Officer at the Society of Biology. Having lived in Kent, I am familiar with the charismatic and sociable starling. I remember seeing starlings huddled in rows on rooftops in the autumn and watching as they fly down to a garden lawn to feed. They land in small groups … Continue reading »

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Art Neuro: Brain Evolution

By Dr Supatra Marsh, BBSRC Policy Fellow at the Society of Biology, Founder of Art Neuro, and awardee of the Society of Biology Regional Grant Scheme. Art Neuro is a science communication project that aims to inform and excite the public about current neuroscience research through the medium of art. Over the past four months … Continue reading »

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Gain-of-function experiments: Putting meaning back into words

Professor Simon Wain-Hobson, professor of virology at the Institut Pasteur, will be speaking at Policy Lates on Thursday 20 November: Dodging a Biological Bullet: What can we learn from the US and Europe about biosecurity? The US pause and de facto moratorium on gain-of-function research on the influenza, SARS and MERS viruses provides a welcome … Continue reading »

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Personalised medicine gets people’s vote

Dr Laura Danielson, Post-Doctoral Training Fellow at the Institute of Cancer Research, recently took part in our Biology: Changing the World debate. As a budding biologist growing up in the northwest corner of the United States, I never imagined that I would be standing at a podium in central London in the middle of a … Continue reading »

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Can we outsmart malaria? A question of tactics

Dara Annett is a PhD student in the Deu group in the Department of Parasitology, currently at the NIMR until the move to the Crick Institute in 2016 Malaria is one of humankind’s oldest battles. Our understanding has increased rapidly in the last century but there are still around 200 million cases reported per year … Continue reading »

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What are we pausing?

Michael J Imperiale is professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Michigan Gain-of-function studies, as the name implies, are experiments in which a new biological behaviour is conferred upon an existing virus e.g. the ability to be transmitted between mammals in the case of the bird flu virus, H5N1. Earlier this month, the … Continue reading »

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Evidence matters, and we can all ask for it

By guest blogger Indrayani Ghangrekar From all directions we are told what we should and shouldn’t do, about diets, staying healthy, fighting disease, avoiding chemicals, helping the environment. Some of the advice is based on rigorous testing and evidence, but some is not. How do you sift through the confusion and work out what to … Continue reading »

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