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Author Archives: Natasha Little

Lead: What do people know?

By Natalie Lamb, PhD Student at The University of Sheffield and Anglian Water, and chair of the Royal Society of Biology East Anglia branch Most people in the UK are aware that lead is a problem. The presence of lead can have an adverse impact on mental development and may be a factor in behavioural problems. When … Continue reading »

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Returning to work after a career break? The four things you should know

By Dr Ruth Griffin, lecturer in biochemistry and genetics at Kingston University Being a parent, I have come across many professionally accomplished full-time mums at school, yet so few have returned to their career. Particularly in science, there is a misconception that it is impossible to get back in if you’ve taken a career break, … Continue reading »

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How can we adapt to climate change?

By Barney Slater AMRSB, BBSRC PhD student at University of Cambridge and policy intern at the Royal Society of Biology. Global climate change is an increasing threat for the UK. Research shows an average temperature increase of almost 1⁰C over the last 50 years in the UK, and climate projections predict that this could climb … Continue reading »

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Here’s to Hypatia: the world’s first female superstar scientist

By Tom Ireland MRSB, editor of The Biologist and managing editor at the Royal Society of Biology. Today is International Day of Women and Girls in Science, a day for celebrating the contributions of women to scientific progress and for inspiring girls to consider careers in STEM subjects. It’s a day to celebrate the great female scientists … Continue reading »

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Seven surprising sunfish facts

By Natasha Phillips, PhD student at Queen’s University Belfast studying the diet & behaviour of ocean sunfish. Last summer Natasha spent two months studying ocean sunfish in Camogli, Italy, with the support of a Travel Grant from the Royal Society of Biology. Grants applications for 2017 are currently open. Over the last two years I have seen hundreds … Continue reading »

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Survey finds fewer than 300 Scottish wildcats remain in Highlands

By Vicky Burns, Scottish Wildcat Action Vicky previously blogged about Securing the future of Scottish Wildcats, here she updates us on SWA’s monitoring and protection work. Scottish wildcats are our only remaining native cat species, and they perform an important function in a healthy ecosystem. They are also part of our cultural heritage in Scotland, with some clan … Continue reading »

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The Physics of Freezing Frogs

By Ellie Welch, science media researcher at STFC’s ISIS Neutron and Muon Source Water is the most ubiquitous substance on the planet, not only covering 70% of the Earth’s surface but also being the most abundant substance found in living things. However, our understanding of water on the molecular level is still limited. Researchers are … Continue reading »

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Can humans smell sex pheromones?

Dr Alfredo Sansone MRSB, research associate at University College London, introduces us to sex pheromones and scientists’ 40 year quest to discover if humans can smell them. You might have heard about pheromones in the news or in some advertisements claiming that a perfume will make you irresistible, however, many people don’t know what pheromone … Continue reading »

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What is dining going to look like in the future?

By Professor Les Firbank FRSB, University of Leeds. Professor Firbank is speaking on the expert panel at today’s Come Dine With The Future event, organised by the RSB and NRN-LCEE in Cardiff. We know that our meals change over time; we are now offered a range of dishes far greater than at any time in history. For tonight’s … Continue reading »

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Clathrin: maintaining cell health in geometric style

By Dr Corinne Smith, reader in structural biology and biophysics, and director of the Research Technology Platform in Advanced Bioimaging at the University of Warwick. Dr Smith was recently awarded a Royal Society Leverhulme Trust Senior Research Fellowship for her work on clathrin. I am intrigued by a protein called clathrin. It consumes my interest … Continue reading »

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