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Tagged With: education

TEF vs. REF: are teaching and research now adversaries?

By Henry Lovett, policy & public affairs officer, The Physiological Society At the recent Labour, Conservative and SNP party conferences, The Physiological Society asked  policy makers to consider an important question: ‘TEF vs. REF: Are Teaching and Research Now Adversaries?’ The successful fringe events discussed how the Government’s development of a Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) … Continue reading »

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Pollination and education in the Peaks

By Ida Griffiths – education officer for Pollinating the Peak at the Bumblebee Conservation Trust. Bumblebees are awesome! But perhaps, being the education officer for Pollinating the Peak – a new Heritage Lottery funded project from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust – I have to say that… However, it’s not just me, my colleagues and keen … Continue reading »

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Teaching: first resort or last resort?

By Ben Connor, Policy Officer, British Ecological Society Does the UK Government have a joined up strategy for teacher recruitment and training? According to Chris Waterman, speaking at the recent Education Policy Lunchbox, the simple answer is ‘no’. Waterman, the former Executive Director of the Association of Directors of Children’s Services (ADCS), whose educational experience … Continue reading »

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Why do students still need textbooks?

By Dan Rowson, education policy officer at the Society of Biology At the May Policy Lunchbox, we welcomed Tim Oates, Group Director of Assessment Research and Development at Cambridge Assessment. Previously Tim was Head of Research at the Qualifications and Curriculum Agency and in 2010 he led the Government review on the National Curriculum. On … Continue reading »

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Location, location, habitat – who shares our neighbourhood?

By David Urry, regional coordinator for the Society of Biology. Applications for the regional grant scheme close on 12th January 2015. Please contact David to find out more or to get involved with running activities in your local area. Curiosity is an innate and essential human quality. It is also the main driver for scientific … Continue reading »

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Supporting our future scientists and engineers

Rachel Lambert-Forsyth, director of education and training at the Society of Biology, discusses the role degree accreditation can play in building the next generation of skilled life scientists.   On 3rd June, I participated in a panel debate for Westminster Higher Education Forums. The topic of the event was ‘Developing the next generation of scientists … Continue reading »

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Future Morph – careers advice for schools

By Mark Downs, chief executive of the Society of Biology At the Society of Biology we have recently benefited from a number of interns, and it is rewarding to see young people develop at the start of their careers. But how do they get to this stage? For undergraduates we offer Life Sciences Careers Conferences, … Continue reading »

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Using British Sign Language (BSL) in science education

Guest blog by Jon Hickman, teacher – science teacher at Ferndown Upper School in Dorset I have been using British Sign Language (BSL) as a visual learning tool in my science classes for the past year. As a kinaesthetic process it is excellent for visual and tactile learners to reinforce key concepts. The majority of … Continue reading »

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