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Blog roll

There are many excellent blogs and websites discussing science, science education, science communication and more. Here are a few of our favourites:

UK Plant Sciences Federation blog

BiochemSoc Blog – news and science from the Biochemical Society

Microbe Post – research published in the Society for General Microbiology’s journals

Podcasts from the Society for General Microbiology

Micropod – podcasts from the Society for Applied Microbiology

British Ecological Society blog – ecology and science policy news

Videos from Understanding Animal Research

AMRC blog – health policy news from the Association of Medical Research Charities

Sense About Science blog – making sense of science and evidence

CaSE blog – policy comment and opinion from the Campaign for Science and Engineering

Nature News Blog

PLOS Blogs – diverse perspectives on science and medicine

Professor Douglas Kell’s blog – from the Chief Executive of the BBSRC

NC3Rs blog – replacement, refinement and reduction of animals in research

The Thesis Whisperer – tips for anyone writing a thesis

Ecosystems Knowledge Network – Resources from the EKN, in which the Natural Capital Initiative is a partner

The Naked Scientists – science radio and podcasts

Bruce Hood’s blog at Huffington Post – psychology

Conservation Bytes – conservation blog from Australia

Southern Fried Science – American marine biology blog

Discover Conservation – Interviews with field biologists from around the world

James Borrell – science, conservation and research

If there are any blogs you’d like to recommend, please get in touch with Natasha Little.

To keep up to date on science news please subscribe to our blog (right) or follow us on Twitter @RoyalSocBio.


One Response to Blog roll

  1. Peter Harrison

    I was interested in the article in Saturday’s Daily Telegraph about the prolonged peak in house-spider activity this year. Perhaps this is due to the whole year being beneficial to these spiders, rather than just the autumn? During the whole of this year, we have had a greatly increased number of spiders’ webs strung across everywhere in our garden. I have assumed this has meant a greater number of spiders – many of the webs have been housing them at the centres. Perhaps this explains the greater number in the house?

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